• SAT (Scholastic Aptitude Test) (Visit https://www.calallen.org/Page/298 for CHS testing dates)

    The SAT is a standardized test widely used for college admissions in the United States. The SAT has four sections: Reading, Writing and Language, Math and an optional Essay.  The total time for the scored portion of the SAT is three hours (or three hours and fifty minutes if the optional essay section is taken). 

    The SAT is typically taken by high school juniors and seniors.  The College Board states that the SAT measures literacy, numeracy and writing skills that are needed for academic success in college. They state that the SAT assesses how well the test takers analyze and solve problems—skills they learned in school that they will need in college. However, the test is administered under a tight time limit (speeded) to help produce a range of scores.

    The College Board also states that use of the SAT in combination with high school grade point average (GPA) provides a better indicator of success in college than high school grades alone, as measured by college freshman GPA. Visit: https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/sat for more information and sign up.

     

    Visit this link to sign up for SAT Practice: KHAN Academy 

    https://learn.khanacademy.org/sat-kickoff-week/?utm_source=cbemail-01763-084-edu-signup&utm_medium=cb418-email&utm_campaign=educator&SFMC_cid=EM262342-&rid=46428893 

     

    To Understand your SAT scores

    Visit: https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/pdf/understanding-sat-scores.pdf

    The SAT score range is between 400 and 1600 for your total score, and 200-800 for each of your two subscores. One subscore is for Math, and one subscore is your combined Reading and Writing scores to make one “Evidence-Based Reading and Writing” score.

    As you would expect, the higher your score, the better you did compared to all the other test-takers. But is there a certain SAT score cutoff that marks a “good” score?

    To determine what makes for good SAT scores relative to everyone else, it’s important to understand how SAT scoring works. Your total score out of 1600 (as well as your two sections subscores out of 800) corresponds to a percentile ranking. Your percentile tells you what percent of students you scored better than. So if you got a 60th-percentile score, you’ve scored better than 60% of all test-takers!

    The 50th-percentile SAT composite score—the average SAT score—is between 1050 and 1060. (The test is deliberately designed so that the average score hovers around 1000 on the 1600-point scale—about 500 per subsection). The average score for math is between 520 and 530 (520 is 49th-percentile and 530 is the 54th). The average SAT score for Evidence-Based Reading and Writing is between 530 (49th percentile) and 540 (53rd percentile).

    SAT test scores follow a normal distribution. This means that student performance tends to cluster around the middle of the scale. Far fewer test-takers score towards the higher and lower end of the scale.

    Here’s an abbreviated SAT score chart with percentiles for 2017 SAT composite scores so you can check out the score distribution for yourself:

    Composite Score (Out of 1600)

    Percentile

    1600

    99+

    1550

    99+

    1510

    99

    1450

    98

    1400

    95

    1330

    90

    1230

    80

    1170

    71

    1110

    61

    1060

    51

    1000

    40

    950

    31

    890

    21

    810

    11

    750

    5

    680

    1

    630

    1-

    400

    1-

    Information was taken from: https://blog.prepscholar.com/what-is-a-good-sat-score-a-bad-sat-score-an-excellent-sat-score

     

    What Is a Good SAT Score for 2018 Overall?

    On an individual level, a good SAT score is any score that gets you into at least one of the schools you want to go to. To figure out what a good 2018 SAT score is for all students, however, we'll need to take a broader view of SAT score data. The best way to do this is to take a look at the most recent data for the average SAT score and SAT score percentiles and see how your scores and percentiles compare.

    As a general rule, good SAT scores are ones that place you in the top half of test-takers; the farther above average your score is, the better. Similarly, a not-so-good SAT score is one that lands you in the bottom half of test-takers (and the further below average your score is, the worse).

    The latest College Board data indicates that the average SAT score for graduating seniors was 1060 (533 Evidence-Based Reading and Writing (EBRW), 527 Math), which means that good SAT scores for 2018 are those above the average SAT score of 1060/1600.

    To take a closer look at the different levels of performance on the SAT, we've created a chart with SAT percentiles and scores using data from students who took the new SAT and graduated in 2017. Remember that a percentile score tells you what proportion of students performed at or below your level (e.g., a 50th percentile score means 50% of students performed as well as or worse than you).

    Percentile

    EBRW

    Math

    TOTAL

    90th percentile (excellent)

    670*

    680*

    1340*

    73rd percentile (good)

    600

    590

    1180

    50th percentile (average)

    530**

    520**

    1050**

    25th percentile (poor)

    460

    450

    910*

    10th percentile (very poor)

    400

    390

    810*

    Source: SAT Understanding Scores 2017  https://collegereadiness.collegeboard.org/pdf/understanding-sat-scores.pdf

    *Score is one percentile higher than percentile listed (e.g. 91st or 24th percentiles).
    **Score is one percentile lower than percentile listed (e.g. 49th percentile).

     

    Students with disabilities

    • If you have a documented disability, you may be eligible for accommodations when you take the SAT and other College Board tests. Some available accommodations are extended time, extra and extended breaks, and reading and seeing accommodations (for example, large-type test books or Braille test books). Students who need to take the SAT using accommodated materials or other accommodations must be approved to do so by Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD). Visit: https://www.collegeboard.org/students-with-disabilities/calendar for accommodation request deadline/s and standards.

    Visit your CHS Counselor for information and requirements.