• ACT (American College Testing Program) (Visit https://www.calallen.org/Page/298 for CHS testing dates)

    The ACT is an entrance exam used by most colleges and universities to make admissions decisions. It is a multiple-choice, pencil-and-paper test administered by ACT, Inc.

    The purpose of the ACT test is to measure a high school student's readiness for college, and provide colleges with one common data point that can be used to compare all applicants.

     

    ACT Basics

    ACT Length

    2 hrs, 55 minutes (plus 40 minutes if taking ACT with writing)

    ACT Sections

    • English
    • Math
    • Reading
    • Science
    • Writing (optional)

    Cost

    $46 ($62.50 if taking ACT with Writing)

    Max. Score

    36

    Avg. Score

    21

    For more information and sign up for ACT testing visit: https://www.act.org/ https://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/the-act.html

     

     

    What Is a Good ACT Score Overall? https://blog.prepscholar.com/what-is-a-good-act-score-a-bad-act-score-an-excellent-act-score

    The ACT score range is from 1-36. As you might imagine, the higher your score, the better you did. But is there a certain cutoff that delineates a “good” ACT score?

    To answer this question, it’s important to understand how ACT scores work. Your composite score from 1-36 corresponds to a percentile that compares how you did to the general population of ACT test-takers. A higher percentile means you scored higher than that percent of students. (So, a 55th percentile score means your score was higher than 55% of students).

    ACT test scores are set up to follow a normal distribution. This means that student performance tends to cluster around the middle of the scale—most test-takers score a somewhere between a little below and a little above the average score. Far fewer test-takers score towards the higher and lower end of the scale.

    The average ACT score is 20. If you’ve scored 20, then you’ve scored higher than 50% of test-takers. That’s pretty good, depending on your frame of reference. A 24 places you at the 74th percentile—better than ¾ of test-takers!

    Here’s an abbreviated chart with ACT score percentiles for 2017-2018 to help you figure out how your scores position you among the overall student test-taker population:

    Your ACT Score

    ACT English Percentile

    ACT Math Percentile

    ACT Reading Percentile

    ACT Science Percentile

    Composite Percentile

    1

    1

    1

    1

    1

    1

    5

    1

    1

    1

    1

    1

    10

    7

    1

    2

    2

    1

    13

    17

    3

    12

    9

    8

    16

    34

    29

    26

    22

    25

    18

    42

    45

    37

    34

    38

    20

    52

    55

    48

    49

    51

    22

    64

    63

    60

    63

    63

    24

    74

    74

    71

    77

    74

    26

    82

    83

    77

    86

    82

    28

    87

    91

    83

    91

    89

    30

    91

    95

    88

    94

    94

    34

    98

    99

    98

    99

    99

    36

    99

    99

    99

    99

    99

    In terms of benchmarks for ACT score percentiles, a score of 16 places you at the 25th percentile, meaning you’ve scored better than a quarter of test-takers. This isn’t a very strong score.

    We’ve already noted that a 20 is an average ACT score, at the 50th percentile. A score of 24 means you’ve scored better than about 74% of students. A 28 means you’ve scored better than 89% of students, and a 31 means you’ve scored better than 96% of them! Anything 34 or above is in the 99th percentile—a truly phenomenal score.

    You can also see that not many people score near the bottom and the top of the scale, because there’s so little percentile change between scores here. Composite scores in the 1-10 range are all in the 1st percentile, and composite scores from 34-36 are all in the 99th percentile!

    By contrast, around the middle of the scale at 20, where most test-takers are clustered, a bump of a few points makes a big difference: going from 18 to 22 moves you from the 38th to the 63rd percentile—a whopping 25 percentile points! But a similar 4-point bump from 24 to 28 only takes you from the 74th to the 89th percentile. That’s just a 15-percentile bump. And from 30 to 34 is only a 5-percentile increase.

    You may notice that section percentiles are a little different than the composite scale. However, the same general score distribution holds.

     

    So, to recap, compared to all test-takers:

    ACT score < 16 = bottom 25%

    ACT score of 20 = right in the middle! (average score)

    ACT score of 24+ = top 25%

    ACT score of 28+ = top 10%

    ACT of 31+ = top 5%

    ACT score of 34+ = top 1% of test-takers

    Information taken from: https://blog.prepscholar.com/what-is-a-good-act-score-a-bad-act-score-an-excellent-act-score

    Also visit the ACT website “Understanding Your Scores” for more information: https://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/the-act/scores/understanding-your-scores.html

     

    Students with Disabilities and English Learner Support/Accommodations for ACT

    ACT is committed to serving examinees with documented disabilities by providing reasonable accommodations appropriate to the examinee's diagnosis and needs. ACT has established policies regarding documentation of an examinee’s disability.

    If you currently receive accommodations in school due to a professionally diagnosed and documented disability, see the ACT Policy for Accommodations Documentation (PDF), which will prepare you and guide you through the process of requesting test accommodations on the ACT test. 

    ACT recognizes the need to expand access to English learners. Beginning in the fall of 2017, ACT will provide supports on the ACT test to U.S. students who are English learners. These supports are designed to improve access and equity for those students whose proficiency in English might prevent them from fully demonstrating the skills and knowledge they have learned in school. The number of English learners is growing in our country and ACT is committed to improve access and opportunity for them and all underserved learners.

    If you currently receive supports in school due to limited English proficiency, see the ACT Policy for English Learner Supports Documentation, which will prepare you and guide you through the process of requesting English learner supports on the ACT test.

    Visit for more information and request deadlines: https://www.act.org/content/act/en/products-and-services/the-act/registration/accommodations.html